www.facebook.com/NationalHemophiliaFoundation twitter.com/NHF_hemophilia /stories/feed

Good Work

Learn how to help others

By Meredith Stanton | 01.13.2010
Originally Published November 2008

As a kid, you probably help out in lots of ways. You pick up your toys around the house for your mom and dad, help clean up your classroom at school or cheer up a friend who’s upset. Lending a hand to others is important. It not only helps them out, but it can make you feel good about yourself, too!

There are plenty of ways for kids with bleeding disorders to help out. You could lend a hand at events like bake sales for your chapter or collecting canned goods for a food drive. Or, get other kids excited about chapter events and programs. You could even visit a local children’s hospital with balloons and toys. Interested? Here are more ways you can help:

Getting Started

Giving back to your community takes time, but it can be really fun and rewarding. You can make new friends or meet people who could be role models in the future.

Here’s how to get started: Think about what you like to do and what catches your attention. Knowing this can help you decide what kind of activity is right for you. There are lots of things you can do on your own or with the help of your local chapter. Ask your mom or dad to get in touch with your chapter and talk to people there first. They have lots of activities set up, especially for kids!

Then, decide how much time you want to spend helping out. Some things may take longer than others, so plan ahead and ask your parents how much time you have to help.

Giving Your All

If you like government, you may be interested in the Great Lakes Hemophilia Foundation’s Youth Ambassador Program. You can travel to Washington, DC, and talk to legislators, the people who make the laws, about getting help for bleeding disorders. Great Lakes also leads a “Walk with the Animals” event at a local zoo to raise money for the chapter.

These are just ideas. Even if your chapter doesn’t do these things now, you could help them get started! Suggest a zoo walk where you live or a field trip to a petting zoo. See if your mom or dad will call your own state capitol about making time to visit.

Lots of kids do a Hemophilia Walk at chapters around the country. The walks raise money for new medicines that make people with bleeding disorders feel better. Kids in Virginia can have fun and help the community with the United Virginia Chapter’s bike ride. You can help organize one for your chapter, too, but don’t forget to wear a helmet!

Camp is also a great way to get involved and help out your community. Ask your camp counselor about things you can do to help. You could act in a drama or skit, organize games or help set up tables and clean them up after meals.

There’s always a way to give back to your community. It’s just a matter of finding out what you want to do and making plans to do it!

Before you agree to volunteer, you’ll need to get permission from your parents. You’ll also need their help getting to and from places you’ll need to be. You could even make your volunteer work a family event.

Go out, give back and have fun!